From the Photo Archives: Some Sunsets..

I thought I’d go for another instalment of photo’s from the archives. Here are some fiery, and not so fiery sunsets for your viewing pleasure……..

2012 Bridgewater Bay

This first one is at Bridgewater Bay, SW Victoria.

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This was taken in 2014, on my way back home from Warracknabeal, in Victoria, near The Grampians. I timed my return to be in this area at sunset……..

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…….and this is one of the shots of The Grampians. The lenticular clouds were amazing above the mountains this particular day.

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I also got this shot, with the rocks illuminated rad, with grazing sheep. Looks much better blown up big, this photo.

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Not one of the most photographically great photo’s, I hate having so much man-made crap in the way of a sunset, unless it suits, but this was the sky on fire, right out my front door a few years back, in Heywood, Victoria.

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This was out my Mum and Dad’s front door at Narrawong, Victoria.

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A little better shot a few months after my other front door shot at Heywood. Almost a painted sky.

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One of my all time favourite shots, I was coming back home from a day out to The Grampians, and this just presented itself. I actually had to turn the car around as I caught it out the corner of my eye as I was driving past, and by the time I got the camera out and set up, I thought I would lose it, but it just lasted for ages.

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This sunset was at the Lee Breakwater in Portland, Victoria. I tried so many times to get the perfect shot with a seagull, and this was closest.

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You will see a few shots at this place in coming posts, it’s at Bridgewater Lakes, in SW Victoria. That’s the Southern Ocean right there, and there is no other land once you leave that beach until Antarctica. Looks warm, was bloody freezing !!!!!

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This was the same day, it’s very misty due to sea spray, it was roaring that day, both wind and surf. The sea is about 500 metres away and about 100 metres below, and the ground was still vibrating with the crashing of the surf.

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And yes, another on the same day at Bridgewater Lakes, with…….the actual lakes !!

 

2016 Phillip Island (31)

This was taken at Phillip Island a couple of years ago, while not as stunning colour-wise as the other ones, I actually like the muted colours.

2016 Narrawong (19)

Another less fiery one, this time at the Surrey River In Narrawong. The reflections just made this. Was expecting a much more lively sunset, but alas, it didn’t happen. Still like this shot though.

2016 Condah (68)

A very plain Jane shot, simple, but I love it. The rays emitted from the horizon were amazing. This is at Condah, in SW Victoria.

2016 Casterton Sunset Storm (6)

This shot came at the tail end of an unsuccessful storm chase, I was chasing storms that just didn’t seem to want to play ball. On the radar, they looked to be moving my way, but they were dissipating and reforming just a little further away constantly, and as much as I drove, I got no closer to any real action. Roads that don’t go directly anywhere don’t help. But, I got this sunset near Casterton, complete with some stars.

2015 Condah (2)

I had this shot, taken near Condah, as my computer desktop image for a while.

2013 MacArthur Windfarm (4)

And to round the sunsets off, how about some renewable energy ?? This is the MacArthur Windfarm in Victoria.

I hope over the coming months I will get the opportunity to gather a few more images around this area  of sunsets, it just so happens that most of the time, it doesn’t work out well with it being dinner time and all.

Anyhow, I hope you enjoyed this lot, until next time, have a nice day, or night, whatever it may be in your part of the world.

Andy.

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From the Photo Archives: Buildings and Man-made Structures – some of my favourites

I have been doing a major re-order of all my photography recently, and as such, have re-discovered a number of photo’s that I think are worth sharing with you. It’s been a useful exercise, most of my photo’s are now easier to find, and seeing I have been suffering so much with the fibromyalgia, it helps take my mind somewhere else for a little relief.

Well, enough of the gas bagging,  welcome to my show !!!!

2011 Portland Botanical Gardens Caretakers Cottage (2)

This first one is of the caretakers cottage at Portland Botanical gardens. I have a love hate relationship with this photo, as it turned out so well, but I hate how it’s postcard perfect.

2010 Cape Nelson Lighthouse

This one, and the next, are at Cape Nelson Lighthouse, near Portland, Victoria. The below one is the entrance to the lighthouse tower.

2012 Cape Nelson (5)2010 Merino

I love old abandoned buildings, this old Petrol Station just got me, it’s at a small village called Merino, in SW Victoria.

2012 Casterton

Jeffreys Cordial Factory, at Casterton, Victoria, the birth place of the Kelpie breed of dog.

2012 Portland Old Town Hall and War Memorial (2)

This is the old Portland Town Hall, with the war memorial in the foreground.

2012 Portland Whalers Bluff Light (2)

Whalers Bluff Lighthouse, in Portland, Victoria, a stout little lighthouse, because of it’s high elevation it doesn’t need to be tall, but very pretty.

2013 Heywood Railway Station

Another of the abandoned buildings, there are heaps of these across Victoria, this is the Old Heywood Railway Station, in SW Victoria.

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I believe this was a Lutheran Church, it is located in Heywood, and was one of my first attempts to photograph buildings at night.

2015 Bessiebelle (2)

A school bus shelter, with Jack as the muse, near Bessiebelle in SW Victoria. I call this “Waiting for the bus that won’t come”. There are heaps of these, sitting unused all over the place in Victoria.

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Another abandoned building in SW Victoria.

2015 Hamilton Skene Woolshed

Skene Woolshed near Hamilton in SW Victoria. Very impressive building, with solid bluestone walls.

2015 Morgiana

This is another old woolshed, but I don’t think much wool has been clipped here for a long time, this was at a locality (not a town to be seen) called Morgiana, in SW Victoria.

2018 Narrawong (5)

This was an old settlers shack in Narrawong, Victoria, just down the hill from my parents old place.

2016 Melbourne Exhibition Building (2)

The Exhibition Building, in Melbourne. I believe it is UNESCO listed.

2015 Melbourne (12)

Another Melbourne landmark, Flinders Street Station, with a modern Tram in front. I love the juxtaposition of this shot, modern and old, with a touch of AC/DC !!!

2012 Melbourne

Another building shot in Melbourne, I loved the difference in the old and new architecture. So much more style in the old, the other is just a boring box.

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This little boathouse is in a Memorial gardens in the Dandenong Ranges, east of Melbourne.

2015 Werribee South (2)

A wooden breakwater at the mouth of the Werribee River at South Werribee.

2019 Paronella Park (3)

And finally, a recent one at Parronella Park.

I hope you enjoyed these shots, I will get some more up in another theme when I am in the mood.

Andy.

Chillagoe, a bit of catching up

I hadn’t realised that I had been so tardy in getting these up.

We went on a big outing a few weeks back to Chillagoe, which is west of Cairns, about a 3 hour drive. It is an old mining town, mainly tin, but other metal ores were also mined around the place as well. It is also one of Australia’s biggest sources of marble.

Below, a few photos of the day………

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This is the site of the old abandoned smelter. Back in the 1990’s, when I first went to Chillagoe, you could walk right around those old structures, nowadays, it is all fenced off, with quite a well designed viewing area, and signage telling you all about the place.

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This is one of the 3 Chimney’s at the site, this was apparently the main on.

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This is a different perspective of the site, showing all three chimney’s the one in the centre was for the powerhouse.

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Even in the wasteland around the site, these beautiful flowers were trying to make a go of it.

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This was where the ore was crushed in the first stage of processing.

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A closer up shot of the powerhouse chimney, which was a different design to the others, it had flat sides, whereas the other two were round to the top.

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After touring the old smelter site, we headed a further 30 km northwest, on the hunt for fossils. Apart from a small piece of petrified wood, we only ended up with a few nice pieces of jasper. This is the Walsh River, beautiful cool and flowing water, and it is so remote out there, it was just serene.

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Another shot of the Walsh River from the road crossing.

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Red termite mounds and Brahman Cattle, you certainly know you are in Northern Australia when you have that view.

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It takes a fair bit of gravel road driving to get out to Chillagoe and beyond, and there are these amazing limestone tors all around Chillagoe. The dirt and dust, and the occasional 3 trailer Road Train is worth the effort.

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One of the truly massive limestone caves that dot the area. In the 1990’s we went into one called the Donna Cave, with all those stalagmites and tites, and they are amazingly beautiful, it’s amazing what happens when you just add water to limestone, and wait a few thousand years !!!

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The limestone ranges, with those red termite mounds that are synonymous with Northern Australia. I’ll leave you with the below closer shot of the scene above. This trip made me realise just how much I love the Savannah Grasslands and Woodlands across northern Australia.

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Andy.

A trip to Tully and back

Monday, the last day of school holidays, saw Mum, Jack and myself get in the car and go out for the day. We took off at around 9am, and got back nearly 8 hours later.

We had an absolutely awesome run to Tull, about 1.5 hours south. Tully is known for having the highest annual rainfall on record in Australia, 7.9 metres of rain (7900mm, or about 311 inches). So, I guess the next thing is, what is there?  Well, here’s a few things.

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This is the Golden Gumboot, complete with it’s Giant Green Tree Frog,  a major draw card for Tully. It is also a lookout, where you can get a good view of the Tully Sugar Mill. Below is the plaque in front of it.

Golden Gumboot Tully

Then, dotted around the main street are these, very decorated rubbish bins………..

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The red gumboots were Jack’s favourite, I preferred the below one…..

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So this is the view from the top of the Golden Gumboot. Tully Sugar Mill, with a diorama in the foreground. It looks like the sugar mill will probably be going full tilt soon, as the sugar cane is nearly ready, and it looks like they have got the place ready to go now.

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Here are a couple of the little Cane Train Locomotives, Tully 12, and Tully 15. The may be small, but they cart 100’s of tonnes of cane each time they go to the mill.

Tully Sugar Mill with Cane Locos

This is the close up of the diorama, the first image is hauling the cane, in the days before the Locomotives, it was all horse drawn tramways then.

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This is the cane cutters loading the carriage………..

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and finally, the farmer with his dog and horse in the cane fields.

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After we left Tully, we headed on over to Mission Beach. It is a lovely beach, where you can look over the water to Dunk Island, a popular resort. Mission Beach was hit by a pretty nasty cyclone a few years back, and it appears to be struggling to recover. It is pretty run down, when I was there 9 years ago, it was an upmarket holiday destination, now it is a bit overgrown, and needs a real bit of elbow grease. I declined to take any photo’s there, as I was a bit shocked, but below is a common road sign in this area. This is the home of the Southern Cassowary.

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Next, we headed west toward Silkwood, where we had some lunch at the Roadhouse, and then drove up the Valley behind Mission Beach and Innisfail. This takes you to Mena Creek, but before we got there, Jack and I took a dip in a swimming hole I knew about from when I lived here a decade ago. The water was just so nice.

At Mena Creek is Paronella Park. It’s recently been the location of a new Australian movie, don’t ask me the name, not quite sure, but Paronella Park was built by a love struck man, and he wanted to build a castle in the jungle. Below is the main bit you can see from the front, a pretty impressive tower. The site also includes a hydro power station, built by the chap who built the park.

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Below this very wobbly suspension bridge is Mena Creek Falls, and Jack was a bit nervy to be on it, but we just had to get the shot !!!

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After leaving Paronella Park, we drove on up to Innisfail, where we ended the day with these very colourful banana’s in pajamas. Innisfail is a huge sugar cane and banana growing area, it’s also where Jack was conceived all those years ago.

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Well, I hope you enjoyed this little bit of a travel story, it’s nice to have something nice to write about !!!

Andy.

Lighten up.

Although I am not much different to recent previous days, I just wanted to lighten up things, as reading what I have written in the past week or so must be full on. It’s raw and true, and really how things are. But I just wanted show you some photo’s I have taken recently.

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This was a shot from a couple of nights ago, straight out the front of our place. I took about 10 shots, this the only one that lit up from the lightning going on deep inside the storm. These storms are mammoth, those “hills” at the bottom are actually 1km tall mountains. Gives you a bit of perspective as to how high into the sky those storms go.

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This is from yesterday, beautiful and sunny, this is the Palmerston Gorge, west of Innisfail.

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This was our little haul from yesterdays outing. Tomatoes and tomato plants, Cucumelon plants, sweet potato, capsicum, avocado, Pawpaw, Pineapple and Spanish Onions.

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And just one last one, from about 2 weeks ago, the male Cassowary and his chick at Etty Bay. Not the best of shots, we pulled over and I had to shoot across the car from the drivers side. The males raise the chicks, and these birds are pretty dangerous if they get upset with you. Absolutely stunning animals though.

Cheers for now.

Andy.

Watching the storms.

Yesterday we had a pretty impressive storm outbreak, brought on by the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Penny. After lunch, Jack and I went off for a little drive, as the sky was looking menacing to the south and west of our place, and, of course, my favourite photographic subject is storms.

We headed a little east and north of home, trying to get a good vantage point of the storms across open ground looking back towards Walsh’s Pyramid, away from power lines and any other man made structure that wasn’t photogenic. It’s hard trying to get a good landscape shot without power lines, and I hate power lines. We sort of left our run too late, as we found a spot, and the storm was really advancing towards us very quickly. I did get a couple of shots, not lightning, the ultimate goal, but the storm was menacing.

This was taken not long after we got out of the car. The sun was still illuminating the foreground. That is Walsh’s Pyramid, the pyramid shaped mountain on the left. The foreground is a sugar cane field in fallow.

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Only a few moments later and the sun was rapidly vanishing, and so was Walsh’s Pyramid !!!

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This was the view to the west of our location, which was at a place called Packer’s Camp., a very turbulent sky indeed. The wind was astonishing as it came over. Under that rain on the left is where we live. There is a mountain about 900 metres above sea level in that rain.

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As the cloud front came upon us, this was the view of the sky to the north. Amazingly blue, with the menacing blackness over our heads.

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We quickly decided that staying out, trying to find a better location to get more shots was a daft idea, the wind was gusting very strongly, buffeting my little car very noticeably. And the rain, it was almost impossible to drive. The water was accumulating on the road so quickly (and these roads are made to cope with a big deluge and drain well), that it was like driving through a pond, the water was 3 or 4 inches deep just from what was falling from the sky.

After a slightly nerve wracking drive the 10 kilometres home, we pulled up in the carport, went out the back verandah, and found 2 inches of water across the rear verandah, it was raining so hard that the drain couldn’t get it away quickly enough. I ended up going out in the rain with the shovel, and dug a trench about 3 inches deep to get the water to flow away down the slope, it was raining so hard, just 10 seconds out in the rain meant you were drenched right through, and the rain was cold !! The trench worked rapidly, and it drained off, even while it was still pouring down. We ended up with 60mm of rain in the space of 30 minutes. in the old scale, that’s probably a bit over 2 inches. In 30 minutes.

Later in the evening, we had a round 2, with lightning flashing intermittently to the west and east. I went out by myself after Jack went to bed, but didn’t capture anything worth sharing. It was nice to see some lightning return after a couple of weeks of nothing.


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Today, it has rained a bit, we’ve had about an inch of rain again, but nothing as spectacular as yesterday. We woke this morning to a bit of a disaster from our elderly dog, we have to contain her during the night in a playpen, so she doesn’t do her business all over the house during the night, we have a tarpaulin under it so if she does anything, it goes on it, and not the floor, and we just take that out to wash it off and clean it. She is very old, nearly 17 years old, and a Jack Russell, she is an awesome dog, but just getting a little incontinent. Dogs, or any pet for that matter, are for life, and you just have to take that getting old will happen.

The disaster was her best yet though. It was contained, but all over the tarp, her bed and bedding, her, it was just full on, and it stank so bad. Even when it was all cleaned up, the smell lingered, and we sprayed every version of room deodoriser we have around. Some just made it worse, as their scent, mixed with, well, the smell of shit, was more revolting than the smell of the shit on it’s own. I know, it’s hard to imagine air freshener making it worse, but trust me, it did. I ended up going over the entire floor, even though it wasn’t on the floor, with a very strong bleach and water solution with the mop, and after that, the smell was gone. I think the bleach dissipating into the air actually killed the smell that was lingering. Tonight, you wouldn’t even know there was such a mess this morning.

My fatigue really is a problem right now. It just doesn’t seem to want to subside. The pain is going from uncomfortable to bad on a roller coaster over the days, today wasn’t so bad on the pain front, but then I have had all sorts of gut issues, and nausea. This fibromyalgia is just sooooo fun !!!

It wears you down.

Andy.

Outing to Yarrabah

Today, we went off on a pure “just drive and see where we end up” outing. Just Jack and myself. My Mum is unwell, so I figured that if we went out for a little bit, she could have some peace and quiet to rest.

After a breakfast of bacon and eggs, we headed off to Yarrabah, an Indigenous Community to the East of Cairns, on the other side of Trinity Inlet. It is a bit of a drive, I thought it was closer, but was so well worth it. The drive had us meandering through the sugarcane fields, and after the downpour we had yesterday from Tropical Cyclone Owen, a lot of the streams were flowing. This was the first time we went to Yarrabah, so didn’t know what to expect, and it was also Jack’s first time going to an Indigenous Community. There are certain things you need to observe when entering Indigenous communities, and you must have the utmost respect for the place and it’s people.

The drive took us up over the mountains, which was quite a climb up and over the range, but the whole thing was worth it. Below, is a photo overlooking the bay that fringes Yarrabah, who wouldn’t want to live in this slice of paradise ??

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We wandered on down from this amazing vantage point into the community below, and as we pulled up at the beachside, a lovely old Aboriginal lady in a wheelchair was having her morning wander around, and we had a little chat. She was an amazingly friendly and warm woman.

We then wandered onto the beach, where we discovered that 2 shipwrecks also inhabited the waters just off the beach. It was a popular photographic subject with both myself and Jack.

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Jack was trying to get the best angle.

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The western headland of the bay also was quite interesting and picturesque.

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We then decided to head back home, but took a detour before getting home to have lunch, which included a feast of Lychees we got at a roadside stall on our travels. Below, is the Western flank of Walsh’s Pyramid, with water streaming down some ephemeral waterfalls due to the heavy rain yesterday.

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We also happened across this colony of Fruit Bats, or Flying Foxes, which just so happens to be not far from our new home. I have been itching for a bit of an explore, but due to all the work we have needed to do, this has been the first proper opportunity.

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All the usual crap with fibromyalgia is happening still, and we still have tonnes more work to do, but it was nice to just kick back for a few hours, and start to explore our new home.

Andy.